Pinoy artists: Preference for foreign music hurting OPM

Photo via universalrecph.blogspot.com

Photo via universalrecph.blogspot.com

By Xianne Arcangel/GMA News – Despite the wealth of musical talent in the Philippines, foreign artists and composers still took the lion’s share of profits from the use of their songs by radio stations and other businesses in 2014, a musicians’ group said Monday.

The Filipino Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, Inc. (FILSCAP) on Monday lamented the poor implementation of the executive order mandating the radio stations to play at least four Original Pilipino Music (OPM) songs every hour, which it said has affected the revenues earned by Filipino artists.

According to FILSCAP general manager Mark Alciso, foreign composers and singers were paid P35 million for use of their music last year, or 75 percent of the total revenues collected by the organization. Local composers and artists, meanwhile, only earned P12 million.

“This shows that the play of foreign works is really predominant,” Alciso told lawmakers at the House committee on basic education and culture’s hearing on House Bill 4218, or the proposed OPM Development Act.

The bill, authored by Ifugao Rep. Teddy Baguilat, seeks to strengthen Executive Order 255 by granting tax credits to radio stations that play at least four OPM songs per clock hour.

Preferential treatment

Executive Order 255 signed by former President Corazon Aquino in 1987 requires all FM radio stations to play a minimum of four OPM compositions per hour. Violators face a fine of P100.

Singer and songwriter Ogie Alcasid, president of the Organisasyon ng Pilipinong Mang-aawit (OPM), said the bias for playing foreign music is commonplace in the country.

“There is preferential treatment for foreign music. You can only just turn on the radio to recognize that,” he said.

Alcasid’s colleague, singer and composer Jim Paredes, noted that he has yet to know of a radio station’s being penalized for violating EO 255. He proposed increasing the number of requisite OPM songs radio stations should play every hour from four to six, or possibly eight. FM radio stations play an average of 12 songs per clock hour.

“I think radio is a beacon of culture and taste. To promote culture, we should really listen to local songs in the radio. It promotes nationhood,” he said.

Equity fees

But more than granting tax incentives to radio stations that play more OPM songs, Filipino artists said the equity fee for foreign artists who perform in the Philippines must be regulated to compensate for the income lost by local performers due to the absence of audience and sponsors.

Under the memorandum of agreement signed by OPM and Asosasyon ng Musikong Pilipino (AMP) with the Bureau of Immigration, foreign performers or their local sponsors only need to pay P5,000 per show for each foreign singer or performer who will use any local venue.

“So if Mariah Carey comes here and earns $500,000, we can only collect P5,000,” Paredes quipped.

Singer Dingdong Avanzado said that while he is supportive of the cultural contributions brought by the influx of foreign artists in the country, Filipino artists also need to be “given preferential rights over any foreign act.”

HB 4218 will require foreign artists to pay Reciprocal Equity Fees equivalent to the amount that will be charged to a Filipino artist performing in the country where the foreign performer is from. The fee will be collected before the foreign artist is allowed to perform in the Philippines.

Independent musicians, for their part, also blasted the bill.

Find more like this: Entertainment, Music

  • Prewar films show Japanese enjoying life in the Philippines
  • Philippines island Boracay reopens for test run following huge cleanup
  • Philippines Wins New Term on U.N. Rights Council, Drawing Outrage
  • In pre-colonial Philippines, we already had kinilaw and corpses smoked tobacco
  • Bongga! More Filipino words now in Oxford English Dictionary
  • Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

    Entertainment

  • Cassette Store Day debuts in Philippines on October 13
  • Meet the New Host of ‘Blues Clues,’ Filipino American Actor Joshua Dela Cruz
  • Here’s why ‘Signal Rock’ is a family drama every Pinoy needs to see
  • An old komiks character is dusted off for modern Pinoy readers
  • Kris Aquino dazzles in yellow at ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ premiere in Hollywood
  • MORE...

    Features

  • Showcase of PH culture, heritage
  • US and Philippines: Friends, Partners, and Allies
  • A Transgender Paradox, and Platform, in the Philippines
  • The Box That Brings Christmas to the Philippines
  • ‘Pinoy Aquaman’ swims 23 kilometers for peace in Mindanao
  • MORE...

    Tourism

  • Philippines island Boracay reopens for test run following huge cleanup
  • Philippines closes ‘cesspool’ tourist island of Boracay
  • Boracay Set to Ban Tourists for Six Months During Island ‘Rehabilitation’
  • Boracay: the good, bad and ugly sides to Philippine island for tourists
  • El Nido to impose daily visitor limits in 3 iconic tourist sites
  • MORE...

    Sports

  • First Filipino table tennis Olympian Ian “Yanyan” Lariba dies at 23
  • Skateboarder Margielyn Didal wins 4th gold for Philippines
  • Asian Games gold medalist Hidilyn Diaz receives Air Force promotion
  • Philippines’ Kong Te Yang is the oldest athlete competing in 2018 Asian Games
  • Cayetano says Philippines plans to bid for 2030 Asian Games
  • MORE...

    OFW News

  • DOLE suspends OFW deployment to Kuwait
  • Some OFWs turn to vlogging to beat loneliness, share life abroad
  • Overseas Filipino Bank to serve immigrants, workers
  • The ‘bagong bayani’ of the Philippines
  • Which countries pay OFWs the highest?
  • MORE...

    Environment

  • Boracay Set to Ban Tourists for Six Months During Island ‘Rehabilitation’
  • Boracay: the good, bad and ugly sides to Philippine island for tourists
  • Luzon has greatest concentration of unique mammals
  • Mindanao plants 3M trees in an hour, challenges world record
  • Fighting for sharks in the Philippines
  • MORE...

    Pinoy Places
    and Faces